Bending a 60-penny Nail while in a wrestler's bridge.
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     W
elcome to Bigsteel.net!  Actually, only the Homepage is here now, with the rest of the site transitioning soon.  

   While not related to strength I have recently expanded my photography page with pictures I have taken over the years.  


   If you haven't done so already please check out the new the Bigsteel Store.   

 


      I only recently became interested in trying horseshoe bending. I was unsuccessful years ago trying to bend horseshoes that, as it turns out, were exceptionally strong.  After getting some partial bends of these hard ones last month I found that I could bend the type of horseshoe below into a full S-Shape.  

   Since this bend I've also bent a shoe that had about 20% more steel and it thus was proportionally harder.  The harder shoe was about the same strength as the Crescent Wrench below, but it took more endurance to bend, requiring three big bends to actually get it spun around in the position shown.

(bent July 7, 2003).


    Bigsteel readers are also on a quest for strength.  Hence, I have begun the Bigsteel Readers Gallery.  Guidelines for submitting pictures to the Gallery are in the Call for Pictures. (3/5/03).
   After meeting Dennis Rogers at the AOBS dinner I was inspired to try and bend a crescent wrench.  I have not been bending lately, letting old injuries heal themselves.  It's hard for me to stay away from bending long and I decided to try again.  I've tried to bend this particular 8" wrench before when I was near my peak.  Nothing happened the last time I tried.  I commented to a friend then that someday I would pull it from my toolbox and I would know I could bend it.  I guess the day had come for this to happen because before the bend my hands felt good and I saw in my mind that the steel was not that strong, after all, Dennis can bend even bigger and thicker 10" wrenches.  I bent the initial bend without bracing my hands, but finished the bend off with my forearms resting on my thighs.  The wrench was admittedly a cheap one, but it is labeled “Drop Forged.”  (9/29/02).

    Here is another great picture from Saturday, June 22, 2002 and the Association of Oldetime Barbell & Strongmen annual reunion Dinner.   This is Slim the Hammer Man Farman, many times referred to as the greatest living strongman.  He certainly put on a show, and at around 70 years of age!  These are two 17-pound hammers which were first lifted to the rear "Weaver stick" style.  Slim then swung them and reversed the grip in his hand.  Once overhead he brought them all the way down to his nose.  For those of you out there who have tried this, note the height of Slim's hands and the angle of the handle to the floor.  Slim actually brought the hammers farther down so that they were parallel to the floor, and the full torque of the weight pulling against his hand and wrist.  7/10/02.


     On Saturday, June 22, 2002 I attended the Association of Oldetime Barbell & Strongmen annual reunion Dinner.   History was made this night as Mark Henry cleaned and pressed an Inch dumbbell replica.    Photos of the event are here.  I saved this picture of Stanless Steele for my web site because I haven't seen any pictures of Stan on the web   He is plunging a 30-penny nail through 2 license plates and a board.  The picture was caught at the moment of impact.  Dennis Rogers and Slim the Hammer Man Farman also wowed the crowd with spectacular feats of strength.  Check back for future descriptions and pictures of  the great feats of strength performed at the event. (6/24/02).


   Feats of Strength News Portal Archive.  

   Please read my Dedication page.

 

    

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